Linux Kernel Podcast for 2017/04/19

Audiohttp://traffic.libsyn.com/jcm/20170419.mp3

[ Apologies for the delay – I have been a little sick for the past day or so and was out on Monday volunteering at the Boston Marathon, so my evenings have been in scarse supply to get this week’s issue completed ]

In this week’s edition: Linus Torvalds announces Linux 4.11-rc7, a kernel security update bonanza, the end of Kconfig maintenance, automatic NUMA balancing, movable memory, a bug in synchronize_rcu_tasks, and ongoing development. The Linux 4.12 merge window should open before next week.

Linus Torvalds announced Linux 4.11-rc7, noting that “You all know the drill by now. We’re in the late rc phase, and this may be the last rc if nothing surprising happens”. He also pointed out how things had been calm, and then, “as usual Friday happened”, leading to a number of reverts for “things that didn’t work out and aren’t worth trying to fix at this point”. In anticipation of the imminent opening of the 4.12 merge window (period of time during which disruptive changes are allowed) Linux Weekly News posted their usual excellent summary of the 4.11 development cycle. If you want to support quality Linux journalism, you should subscribe to LWN today.

Ted (Theodore) Ts’o posted “[REGRESSION] 4.11-rc: systemd doesn’t see most devices” in which he noted that “[t]here is a frustrating regression in 4.11 that I’ve been trying to track down. The symptoms are that a large number of systemd devices don’t show up.” (which was affecting the encrypted device mapper target backing his filesystem). He had a back and forth with Greg K-H (Kroah Hartman) about it with Greg suggesting Ted watch with udevadm and Ted pointing out that this happens at boot and is hard to trace. Ted’s final comment was interesting: “I’d do more debugging, but there’s a lot of magic these days in the kernel to udev/systemd communications that I’m quite ignorant about. Is this a good place I can learn more about how this all works, other than diving into the udev and systemd sources?”. Indeed. In somewhat interesting timing, Enric Balletbo i Serra later posted a 5 part patch series entitled “dm: boot a mapped device without an initramfs”.

Rafael J. Wysocki posted some late breaking 4.11-rc7 fixes for ACPI, including one patch reverting a “recent ACPICA commit [to the ACPI – Advanced Configuration and Power Interface – Component Architecture aka reference code upon which the kernel’s runtime interpretor is based] targeted at catching firmware bugs” that did do so, but also caused “functional problems”.

Announcements

Jiri Slaby announced Linux 3.12.73.

Greg KH (Kroah-Hartman) announced Linux 3.18.49, 3.19.49 4.4.62, 4.9.23, and 4.10.11. As he noted in his review posting prior to announcing the latest 3.18 kernel, 3.18 was indeed “dead and forgotten and left to rot on the side of the road” but “unfortunately, there’s a few million or so devices out there in the wild that still rely on this kernel”. Important security fixes are included in all of these updates. Greg doesn’t commit to bring 3.18 out of retirement for very long, but he does note that Google is assisting a little for the moment to make sure 3.18 based devices get some updates.

Steven Rostedt announced “Real Time” (preempt-rt) kernels 3.2.88-rt126 (“just an update to the new stable 3.2.88 version”), 3.12.72-rt97, and 4.4.60-rt73. Separately, Paul E. McKenney noted “A Hannes Weisbach of TU Dresden published this master thesis on quasi-real-time scheduling:
http://os.inf.tu-dresden.de/papers_ps/weisbach-master.pdf

Rafael J. Wysocki announced a CFP (Call For Papers) targeting the upcoming LPC (Linux Plumbers Conference) Power Management and Energy-Awareness microconference “Call for topics”. Registration for LPC just opened.

Yann E. MORIN posted “MAINTAINERS: relinquish kconfig” in which he apologized for not having enough time to maintain Kconfig with “I’ve been almost entirely absent, which totally sucks, and there is no excuse for my behavior and for not having relinquished this earlier”. With such harsh friends as yourself, who needs enemies? Joking aside, this is sad news, since Kconfig is the core infrastructure used to configure the kernel. It wasn’t long before someone else (Randy Dunlap) posted a patch for Kconfig that no longer has a maintainer (Randy’s patch implements a sort method for config options)

[as an aside, as usual, I have pinged folks who might be looking for an opportunity to encourage them to consider stepping up to take this on].

Automatic NUMA balancing, movable memory, and more!

Mel Gorman posted “mm, numa: Fix bad pmd by atomically check for pmd_trans_huge when marking page tables prot_numa”. Modern Linux kernels include a feature known as automatic numa balancing which relies upon marking regions of virtual memory as inaccessible via their page table entries (PTEs) and set a special prot_numa protection hinting bit. The idea is that a later “NUMA hinting fault” on access to the page will allow the Operating System to determine whether it should migrate the page to another NUMA node. Pages are simply small granular units of system memory that are managed by the kernel in setting up translations from virtual to physical memory. When an access to a virtual address occurs, hardware (or, on some architectures, special software) “walkers” navigate the “page tables” pointed to by a special system register. The walker will traverse various “directories” formed from collections of pages in a hierarchical fashion intended to require less space to store page tables than if entries were required for every possible virtual address in a 32 or 64-bit space.

Contemporary microprocessors also support multiple page (granule) sizes, with a fundamental size (commonly 4K or 64K) being supplemented by the ability for larger pages (aka “hugepages”) to be used for very large regions of contiguous virtual memory at less overhead. Common sizes of huge pages are 2MB, 4MB, 512M, and even multi-GB, with “contiguous hint bits” on some modern architectures allowing for even greater flexibility in the footprint of page table and TLB (Translation Lookaside Buffer) entries by only requiring physical entries for a fraction of a contiguous region. On Intel x86 Architecture, huge pages are implemented using the Page Size Extensions (PSE), which allows for a PMD (Page Middle Directory) to be replaced by an entry that effectively allocates the entire range to a single page entry. When a hardware walker sees this, a single TLB entry can be used for an entire range of a few MB instead of many 4K entries.

A bug known as a “race condition” exist(ed) in the automatic NUMA hinting code in which change_pmd_range would perform a number of checks without a lock being held to protect against a concurrent race againt a parallel protection updated (which does happen under a lock) that would clear the PMD and fill it with a prot_numa entry. Mel adds a new pmd_none_or_trans_huge_or_clear_bad function that correctly handles this rare corner case sequence, and documents it (in mm/mprotect.c). Michal Hocko responded with “you will probably win the_longer_function_name_contest but I do not have [a] much better suggestion”.

Speaking of Michal Hocko, he posted version 2 of a patch series entitled “mm: make movable onlining suck less” in which he described the current status quo of “Movable onlining” as “a real hack with many downsides”. Linux divides memory into regions describing zones with names like ZONE_NORMAL (for regular system memory) and ZONE_MOVABLE (for memory the contents of which is entirely pages that don’t contain unmovable system data, firmware data, or for other reasons cannot be trivially moved/offlined/etc.).

The existing implementation has a number of constraints around which pages can be onlined. In particular, around the relative placement of the memory being onlined vs the ZONE_NORMAL memory. This, Michal described as “mainly reintroduction of lowmem/highmem issues we used to have on 32b systems – but it is the only way to make the memory hotremove more reliable which is something that people are asking for”. His patch series aims to make “the onlining semantic more usable [especially when driven by udev]…it allows to online memory movable as long as it doesn’t clash with the existing ZONE_NORMAL. That means that ZONE_NORMAL and ZONE_MOVABLE cannot overlap”. He noted that he had discussed this patch series with Jérôme Glisse (author of the HMM – Heterogenous Memory Management – patches) which were to be rebased on top of this patch series. Michal said he would assist with resolving any conflicts.

Igor Mammedov (Red Hat) noted that he had “given [the movable onlining] series some dumb testing” and had found three issues with it, which he described fully. In summary, these were “unable to online memblock as NORMAL adjacent to onlined MOVABLE”, “dimm1 assigned to node 1 on qemu CLI memblock is onlined as movable by default”, and “removable flag flipped to non-removable state”. Michal wasn’t initially able to reproduce the second issue (because he didn’t have ACPI_HOTPLUG_MEMORY enabled in his kernel) but was then able to followup noting that it was similar to another bug he had already fixed. Jérôme subsequently followed up with an updated HMM patchset as well.

Joonsoo Kim (LGE) posted version 7 of a patch series entitled “Introduce ZONE_CMA” in which he reworks the CMA (Contiguous Memory Allocator) used by Linux to manage large regions of physcially contiguous memory that must be allocated (for device DMA buffers in cases where scatter gather DMA or an IOMMU are not available for managed translations). In the existing CMA implementation, physically contiguous pages are reserved at boot time, but they operate much as reserved memory that happens to fall within ZONE_NORMAL (but with a special “migratetype”, MIGRATE_CMA), and will not generally be used by the system for regular memory allocations unless there are no movable freepages available. In other words, only as a last possible resort.

This means that on a system with 1024MB of memory, kswapd “is mostly woke[n] up when roughly 512MB free memory is left”. The new patches instead create a distinct ZONE_CMA which has some special properties intended to address utilization issues with the existing implementation. As he notes, he had a lengthy discussion with Mel Gorman after the LSF/MM 2016 conference last year, in which Mel stated “I’m not going to outright NAK your series but I won’t ACK it either”. A lot of further discussion is anticipated. Michal Hocko might have summarized it best with, “the cover letter didn’t really help me to understand the basic concepts to have a good starting point before diving into the implementation details [to review the patches]”. Joonsoo followup up with an even longer set of answers to Michal.

A bug in synchronize_rcu_tasks()

Paul E. McKenney posted “There is a Tasks RCU stall warning” in which he noted that he and Steven Rostedt were seeing a stall that didn’t report until it had waited 10 minutes (and recommended that Steven try setting the kernel rcupdate.rcu_task_stall_timeout boot parameter). RCU (Read Copy Update) is a clever mechanism used by Linux (under a GPL license from IBM, who own a patent on the underlying technology) to perform lockless updates to certain types of data structure, by tracking versions of the structure and freeing the older version once references to it have reached an RCU quiescent state (defined by each CPU in the system having scheduled synchronize_rcu once).

Steven noted that for the issue under discussion there was a thread that “never goes to sleep, but will call cond_resched() periodically [a function that is intended to possibly call into the scheduler if there is work to be done there]”. On the RT (Real Time, “preempt-rt”) kernel, Steven noted that cond_resched() is a nop and that the code he had been working on should have made a call directly to the schedule() function. Which lead to him suggesting he had “found a bug in synchronize_rcu_tasks()” in the case that a task frequently calls schedule() but never actually performs a context switch. In that case, per Paul’s subsequent patch, the kernel is patched to specially handle calls to schedule() not due to regular preemption.

Ongoing Development

Anshuman Khandual posted “mm/madvise: Clean up MADV_SOFT_OFFLINE and MADV_HWPOISON” noting that “madvise_memory_failure() was misleading to accommodate handling of both memory_failure() as well as soft_offline_page() functions. Basically it handles memory error injection from user space which can go either way as memory failure or soft offline. Renamed as madvise_inject_error() instead.” The madvise infrastructure allows for coordination between kernel and userspace about how the latter intends to use regions of its virtual memory address space. Using this interface, it is possible for applications to provide hints as to their future usage patterns, relinquish memory that they no longer require, inject errors, and much more. This is particularly useful to KVM virtual machines, which appear as regular processes and can use madvise() to control their “RAM”.

Sricharan R (Codeaurora) posted version 11 of a patch series entitled “IOMMU probe deferral support”, which “calls the dma ops configuration for the devices at a generic place so that it works for all busses”.

Kishon Vijay Abraham sent a pull request to Greg K-H (Kroah Hartman) for Linux 4.12 that included individual patches in addition to the pull itself. This resulted in an interesting side discussion between Kishon and Lee Jones (Linaro) about how this was “a strange practice” Lee hadn’t seen before.

Thomas Garnier (Google) posted version 7 of a patch series entitled “syscalls: Restore address limit after a syscall” which “ensures a syscall does not return to user-mode with a kernel address limit. If that happened, a process can corrupt kernel-mode memory and elevate privileges”. Once again, he cites how this would have preemptively mitagated a Google Project Zero security bug.

Christopher Bostic posted version 6 of a patch series enabling support for the “Flexible Support Interface” (FSI) high fan out bus on IBM POWER systems.

Dan Williams (Intel) posted “x86, pmem: fix broken __copy_user_nocache cache-bypass assumptions” in which he says “Before we rework the “pmem api” to stop abusing __copy_user_nocache() for memcpy_to_pmem() we need to fix cases where we may strand dirty data in the cpu cache.”

Leo Yan (Linaro) posted an RFC (Request For Comments) patch series entitled “coresight: support dump ETB RAM” which enables support for the Embedded Trace Buffer (ETB) on-chip storage of trace data. This is a small buffer (usually 2KB to 8KB) containing profiling data used for postmortem debug.

Thierry Escande posted “Google VPD sysfs driver”, which provides support for “accessing Google Vital Product Data (VPD) through the sysfs”.

Alex(ander) Graf posted version 6 of “kvm: better MWAIT emulation for guests”, which provides new capability information to user space in order for it to inform a KVM guest of the availability of native MWAIT instruction support. MWAIT allows a (guest) kernel to wake up a remote (v)CPU without an IPI – InterProcessor Interrupt – and the associated vmexit that would then occur to schedule the remote vCPU for execution. The availability of MWAIT is deliberately not provided in the normal CPUID bitmap since “most people will want to benefit from sleeping vCPUs to allow for over commit” (in other words with MWAIT support, one can arrange to keep virtual CPUs runnable for longer and this might impact the latency of hosting many tenants on the same machine).

David Woodhouse posted version 2 of his patch series entitled “PCI resource mmap cleanup” which “pursues my previous patch set all the way to its logical conclusion”, killing off “the legacy arch-provided pci_mmap_page_range() completely, along with its vile ‘address converted by pci_resource_ro_user()’ API and the various bugs and other strange behavior that various architectures had”. He noted that to “accommodate the ARM64 maintainers’ desire *not* to support [the legacy] mmap through /proc/bus/pci I have separated HAVE_PCI_MMAP from the sysfs implementation”. This had previously been called out since older versions of DPDK were looking for the legacy API and failing as a result on newer ARM server platforms.

Darren Hart posted an RFC (Request For Comments) patch series entitled “WMI Enhancements” that seeks to clean up the “parallel efforts involving the Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) and dependent/related drivers”. He wanted to have a “round of discussion among those of you that have been invovled in this space before we decide on a direction”. The proposed direction is to “convert[] wmi into a platform device and a proper bus, providing devices for dependent drivers to bind to, and a mechanism for sibling devices to communicate with each other”. In particular, it includes a capability to expose WMI devices directly to userspace, which resulted in some pushback (from Pali Rohár) and a suggestion that some form of explicit whitelisting of wmi identifiers (GUIDS) should be used instead. Mario Limonciello (Dell) had many useful suggestions.

Wei Wang (Intel) posted version 9 of a patch series entitled “Extend virtio-balloon for fast (de)inflating & fast live migration” in which he “implements two optimizations”. The first “tranfer[s] pages in chunks between the guest and host”. The second “transfer[s] the guest unused pages to the host so that they can be skipped in live migration”.

Dmitry Safonov posted “ARM32: Support mremap() for sigpage/vDSO” which allows CRIU (Checkpoint and Restart in Userspace) to complete its process of restoring all application VMA (Virtual Memory Area) mappings on restart by adding the ability to move the vDSO (Virtual Dynamic Shared Object) and sigpage kernel pages (data explicitly mapped into every process by the kernel to accelerate certain operations) into “the same place where they were before C/R”.

Matias Bjørling (Cnex Labs) prepared a git pull request for “LightNVM” targeting Linux 4.12. This is “a new host-side translation layer that implements support for exposing Open-Channel SSDs as block devices”.

Greg Thelen (Google) posted “slab: avoid IPIs when creating kmem caches”. Linux’s SLAB memory allocator (see also the paper on the original Solaris memory allocator) can be used to pre-allocate small caches of objects that can then be efficiently used by various kernel code. When these are allocated, per-cpu array caches are created, and a call is made to kick_all_cpus_sync() which will schedule all processors to run code to ensure that that there are no stale references to the old array caches. This global call is performed using an IPI (InterProcessor Interrupt), which is relatively expensive, especially in the case that a new cache is being created (and not replacing an old one). In that case wasteful IPIs are generated on the order of 47,741 additional ones in the example given vs. 1,170 in a patched kernel.

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